Friday Night Flicks: A St. Patrick’s Day Porcupine

It’s a very short video again this week (just over a minute) but it comes with a bit of a preamble.

David and I have mixed feelings about porcupines: they are rather sweet in an incredibly dim sort of way, but they have the distressing habit of doing irreparable damage by chewing the bark off our 100 year old Scotch pines. In an attempt to deal with the problem, David has become a porcupine hunter. This involves his arming himself with a long stick and a plastic garbage pail. Ideally, the hunt takes place when there is plenty of snow on the ground, and when there has been a fresh snowfall so that the porcupine is easy to track. When located, the porcupine is prodded off a tree branch (if it can be reached) or out from under a brush pile and scooped up in the garbage pail.

The captured porcupine is then deported to a local nature preserve, where the staff are thrilled to get them. They take student groups out for nature walks and not only are porcupines easy to track, there’s a good chance of actually finding one without having to go too far.

Here’s a picture of a friend releasing one of David’s recent catches.

Here’s a picture of the pointy part.

And here’s a picture of a baby one David captured a couple of summers ago. (Mom was already occupying the garbage pail, so the baby had to make do with a small cardboard box.)

All this is an introduction to tonight’s video. St. Patrick’s Day is coming, when apparently everyone is a little bit Irish: even porcupines.

 

May your glass be ever full.

May the roof over your head be always strong.

And may you be in heaven

half an hour before the devil knows you’re dead.

About Byopia Press

I have been working in the book arts field for more than twenty years, and operating Byopia Press with my husband David since the late 1990s. I began producing artist's books and altered books in 2004.
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One Response to Friday Night Flicks: A St. Patrick’s Day Porcupine

  1. Pingback: Too Much Email | Byopia Press

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