Friday Night Flicks: Nature of Language

A number of contemporary artists use lettering in one form or other in their paintings. It is not a particularly new thing. Recent calligraphic paintings can trace their roots back to the late 1960s and early 1970s. Their predecessors are painters like Joseph Kosuth and Cy Twombly.

Joseph Kosuth, (Art as Idea as Idea) [Nothing], 1968

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1968

Contemporary paintings also often exhibit influences from tag art and graffiti.

Today’s video shows José Parlá painting Nature of Language on location in the Hunt Library (SNØHETTA), North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina. Part of the artist’s statement that accompanies the video states:

I found inspiration in the essence of words and their combined power however abstract within a landscape of gestural forms and characters that serve as carriers of meaning. Within this meta-landscape a viewer is welcomed to read into or feel the Nature of this universal language putting grammatical forms on hold.

 

With patches of extreme weather occurring around the globe, I hope your weekend is meteorologically boring.

 

 

About Byopia Press

I have been working in the book arts field for more than twenty years, and operating Byopia Press with my husband David since the late 1990s. I began producing artist's books and altered books in 2004.
This entry was posted in art, Design, installation and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Friday Night Flicks: Nature of Language

  1. lcmt says:

    I really like the phrase: “abstract within a landscape of gestural forms and characters that serve as carriers of meaning”.

    Like

  2. Mary Kritz says:

    Thanks Cathryn for these fantastic videos. Jake’s talk was refreshing as I read about a lot of the things he talked about when I was doing my 365 Days of Handwriting. Weather in Ottawa, this weekend, was overcast, cold and snowfall. Spring is around the corner.

    Like

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