Byopia Press 2018 Advent Calendar: Day Four and a Japanese Letter Fold

I’m not sure when I first learned this fold. I didn’t know it in high school, so I must have come across it somewhere since then.

The important thing to remember is that your paper needs to be about twice as long as it is wide. My model was made with moderately heavy paper so I cut a 15.25 x 30.5 cm (about 6″ x 12″) strip and folded it into thirds. (If you are using a thin paper you could fold it into fourths, which would give your finished letter fold longer ‘legs’.)

The next step is a bit tricky, but I’m sure you can handle it. You need to fold your strip in diagonally so that the two legs form a right angle.

You can use the corner of another sheet of paper, or a book, as a guide. Try to make the legs about the same length, but don’t worry if they are not exact.

The next step is to fold the left leg to the right so that it lies parallel to the right leg.

Turn your paper over so that it looks like the image below.

Now fold the left leg over the right so that the upper edge (left pointy finger) lies against the fold indicated by the right pointy finger. Your letter should look like this.

Take the upper leg (indicated by the pink pointy finger) and tuck it under the lower leg. Your completed fold should look like the next picture.

I found a variation of this fold on the internet.

If you want to try it out, you can find the instructions here.

Tomorrow’s post will feature two triangular letter folds —one moderately complex and the other super simple— which can also be used as packaging.


In other news:

We have been having mild weather just below freezing, with fog. This has resulted in some of the best hoarfrost in years. Here’s one of David’s pictures.

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About Byopia Press

I have been working in the book arts field for more than twenty years, and operating Byopia Press with my husband David since the late 1990s. I began producing artist's books and altered books in 2004.
This entry was posted in book arts, instructions, origami, paper folding and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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