Byopia Press 2018 Advent Calendar: Day Twenty-one and A Card Case

I always seem to have more cards than will fit in my wallet easily. A small case for the ones I don’t use often (coffee cards, membership cards) has proven most useful. Today’s fold re-visits the structure of the Regency letter fold to produce a small card case.

There is an origami version of this fold. It begins with the paper laid out with the long measurement placed width-wise. Then the sides are folded in to the middle. This produces pockets which extend all the way to the centre fold. I find that this makes getting cards in and out difficult, so here is a version produced by measuring before folding.

I started with a sheet of 24# paper cut to 8.5″ square. I scored a vertical line 1.75″ in from each side, then folded the sides toward the middle along the score lines.

I opened the side folds, then turned the bottom right corner in. The left edge of the triangle created sits just shy of the vertical crease.

I repeated the last fold with the other three corners, then re-folded the side flaps.

The paper was turned over so that the flaps were face down, then I scored a horizontal line 2.375″ (two and three eights inches) up from the bottom edge and folded the bottom edge up. I rotated the paper 180°, and repeated the same horizontal score and fold with the new bottom edge, then tucked one end into the other.

All that remained was to fold the card case in half and slip some cards into it.

You can even put cards on the outside of the case.

I have made a printable version in three different colourways. You can download a pdf for the 8.5 x 11″ version here, for the A4 version here. After you have printed your paper, trim off the top and side edges outside the printed area. Trim off the bottom using the bottom of the printed bands as a guide. Score a vertical line at the inner edge of each printed band, then turn your paper printed side down.

Fold the sides toward the middle along the score lines.

Open the sides and turn in the corners. Your triangles should be just shy of the vertical creases.

Re-fold the side flaps, turn your paper printed side down, then score a horizontal line. The line should be 2.375″ up from the bottom edge for 8.5 x 11″ paper, about 5.75 cm for A4. (You can use a credit card to check your fit. The important thing is to make sure the ends overlap enough so that you can tuck one end into the other.)

Rotate 180° and repeat, then fold the card case in half after tucking one end into the other.

If you would like to make the floral version shown in the first image, you can find it at The House That Lars Built.

I found the instructions a bit vague in a couple of places, but you can substitute the instructions for my printed version above. Trim the unprinted sides off the page, then cut your paper so that it is the same height as the trimmed width. Your paper should look like the image below before you start scoring and folding.

Of course, the really interesting thing about the card case is that you can adapt the structure to make a book cover. With a little careful calculation and a large enough piece of paper, you should be able to make something that looks like this.

You could even print your endpapers with a design or image that makes use of the notch.

I will show you another card case/book cover tomorrow.

 

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About Byopia Press

I have been working in the book arts field for more than twenty years, and operating Byopia Press with my husband David since the late 1990s. I began producing artist's books and altered books in 2004.
This entry was posted in artist's books, book arts, bookbinding, free printable, instructions, paper folding and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Byopia Press 2018 Advent Calendar: Day Twenty-one and A Card Case

  1. Pingback: Byopia Press 2018 Advent Calendar: Day Twenty-five and An Index | Byopia Press

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