The Final Box (and a gift of flowers)

I finished the final prototype for the blue boxes this week. (In the box industry it’s called a Reverse Tuck End with friction fit tabs.) I designed it with the flaps on the sides of the lid because the box may be opened and closed numerous times and the side flaps make the lid a bit sturdier.

The side flaps necessitate a thumb gap in the front. While I have a nice oval punch to cut the gap, it is not easy to centre it as the body of the punch and the front of the box are different widths. This will call for a moderately complicated jig system. Perhaps the nine boxes will be finished by next Sunday.

Much of my work time this past week was spent on the annual Byopia Press limited edition calendar. I finished processing the thirteen images, completed the layout, printed thirty copies, and collated them.

The printing involves standing by the printer and hand-feeding the pages. I print on 100# card, which is approaching the upper limit of paper weight that the machine will handle happily. (The next three pictures have been carefully photographed to not reveal the calendar images.)

Pages on the printer:

Stacks of the two printed pages on the worktable:

Stack of collated pages on the worktable:

 

The rest of my work week was spent making a DIY 2021 calendar for you. (I thought we could all use a gift of flowers about now.)

The pages should print on either A4 or 8.5 x 11 inch card stock.

I also made a blank version so you can add your own pictures.

For the flower version, download and print 2021 mini flower DIY calendar. The pages of the blank version are jpegs since I thought it would make it easier for people to add photos, but you can also paste pictures on the pages, or draw on them. For the blank version print page one, page two, page three, and page four.

Cut out your calendar pages by cutting your printed pages vertically, using the vertical guide marks. (The sides of the images will help, if you are making the flower calendar.)  Cut your strips into individual pages along the thin black horizontal lines.

Collate.

Place the group image page facing out on the back of your collated stack.

This calendar has an extremely simple binding: a binder clip. It holds the pages together and provides a hanging mechanism.

If you would rather have a desktop display, you could fold one out of the leftover blank side of card. Find inspiration here and here.

About Byopia Press

I have been working in the book arts field for more than twenty years, and operating Byopia Press with my husband David since the late 1990s. I began producing artist's books and altered books in 2004.
This entry was posted in book arts, bookbinding, Design, DIY, illustration and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to The Final Box (and a gift of flowers)

  1. barleybooks says:

    You are so generous! Thank you! A ray of sunshine on a dark day.

    Like

  2. Pingback: The Calendar Completed (and a Beeston label) | Byopia Press

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